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>> host: joining us this week on "the communicators" is jeff gardner is chairman of the u.s. telecom and president and ceo of the windsupreme corporation. tell us what u.s. telecom is and who you represent. >> guest: we remit the tornado - telephone companies in the united states from at and t to the shallest, and we put together ideas to take care of our consumers in a better way. >> host: how many are there here in the united states now? >> guest: there's thousands of telephone companies in the u.s. still. there's been consolidation, but there's a lot of small telephone companies. we have from verizon to small companies that are co-ops involved in the united states telephone association today. still, many different business issues as a part of that. we all try to work together to refuel solve common issues. that's what the whole purpose of the association is. >> host: we want to get into the policy issues in a minute, but first of all, what is windstream p >> guest: it's a wonderful company. i may be biased in that review, but we're mainly focused in rural america providin
that there was a very large conspiracy, usually involving figures within the u.s. government, and a massive cover-up. >> this weekend on c-span3, 49 years later, the questions remain. lone gunman, the mob, the cia, castro. what happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy, 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> it was in 1982 that judge harold greene issued a decision which led to the breakup of the at&t corp.. that is our topic this week on the "communicators," the impact of that decision 30 years later on the telecommunications. joining us is professor roger noll of stanford, as well as professor jerry hausman of mit, both of whom were involved at various levels in the breakup or the decision to break up at&t. joining us in the washington studio is paul. professor noll, first of all, what with your activity during the breakup of at&t and what led to that decision? >> the antitrust case was formed during the johnson administration the late 1960's and a presidential task force called the telecommunications policy task force. it concluded the telecommunications industry, the part in federal
institute for the u.s./china relationship. >> host: well, it was in 1982 that judge harold green issued a decision which led to the breakup of the at&t corporation, and that's our topic this week on "the communicators," the impact of that decision 30 years later on telecommunications. joining us in a round table discussion is professor roger noll of stanford, as well as professor jerry hausman of mit. both of these gentlemen were involved at various levels in the breakup or the decision to break up at&t. joining us here in our washington studio is paul barbagallo of bloomberg. professor noll, first of all, what was your role or activity during the breakup of at&t, and what led to that decision? >> guest: well, the roots of the antitrust case were in a presidential task force that was formed during the johnson administration in the late 1960s called the telecommunications policy task force. it had concluded that the telecommunications industry, at least the part of it that was in the federal jurisdiction, could be competitive and made recommendations both to the -- mainly to the federal
who has a couple of titles. number one, he's chairman of a group called u.s. telecom, and he's also president and ceo of the windstream corporation. mr. gardner, first of all, tell us what u.s. telecom is and what you represent. >> guest: well, we represent the telephone companies in the united states of america from the very biggest -- seizen, at&t -- to some of the very smallest. and what we try to do is really get together as a group, put together ideas so that we can really take care of our consumers in a better way. >> host: so when you talk about the small telephone companies, how many are there out here in the united states now? >> guest: there's thousands of telephone companies in the u.s. still, and so there's been plenty of consolidation, but there's still a lot of very small telephone companies. we have from verizon to small companies that are co-ops even involved in united states telephone association today. so still many different business issues as a part of that. we all try to work together to really solve common issues. that's what the whole purpose of the associatio
issue. we've been working on more on a state by state basis within wind stream. the u.s.t.a. has been involved in that on how we might help there but i think we've got a lot of work to do there. >> what about whit comes to mobile broad band is that included in the access america plan? >> it is. i think that one of the mobile brondsband going to play a big role as some of the large companies has rolled out services. the latest 4 g is improving the broad band capabilities. but i think fundamentally everybody i think miss a couple of points here often and that is without a land line connection there is no wireless because it's all going back to the public switch telephone network. so we have to pay attention to both types of infrastructure and around fissics i think of mobility is going to be a complementary service. it's not going to be a replace of employment for broad band. more and more people are off loading from their wired access and it's because of things like spectrum limitations. so for that to work in concert i think of mobility and wired access as complementary. >> so much of
. >> gentlemen, you mentioned the importance of wireless. a third of u.s. families have cut the cord. last year, as both of you know, we heard lots of artisans my question is how many competitors do we need in the market to ensure this? >> guest: that is a very hard question because the technology changes so rapidly. but the standard answer that most economists would give you is somewhere around five robust companies that are innovative, it is the number that would guarantee you a competitive outcome. indeed, many are wireless carriers. i am not particularly worried. the main issue about the reliance on competition in wireless to keep us all happy and innovative is the spectrum issue. but the government still sits on an enormous quality of spectrum that is not utilized at all. sometime over the next few years, we have to break that loose. we have to create substantially more spectrum that is available to the private sector for use in wireless telephony. and also telecommunications. i think that will happen, although every time one makes his step, one finds resistance. so i think the single most
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6